Space and Aviation
Customized Models
Made to Order Models
Maritime Models
Civilian and Commercial
Vessels
Military Ships and Boats
Half-Hull and 
Half Models
Plaques and 
Vehicles
Specialty Items
Find your Model
Payments Options
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Military Aviation.
Helicopter.
Site Search.
Civilian Aviation.
Comercial Aviation.
Air Force.
Army Air Corps.
Navy and Marines.
Trainers.
Rotorcrafts.
Space Exploration.
Power Yacht.
Sail Yacht.
Classic Sail Boats.
Commercial and Passenger Vessels.
Aircraft Carriers.
Amphibious Ships.
Auxiliaries and Service Vessels.
Battle Ships.
Cruisers.
Destroyers.
Destroyer Escorts.
Escort Carriers.
Frigates.
Iron Clads.
Landing Crafts.
Mine Crafts.
PT Boats.
Patrol Crafts.
Submarines.
Tall Ships.
USCG Boats & Cutters.
Half-Hull.
Half Models.
Plaques.
Military Vehicles.
Civilian Vehicles.
One of a Kind Models.
Weapons & Ammunitions.
Clear Canopy.
All rights reserved copyright © Aero-Nautique Models
Home.
Contact Us.
About Us.
Made to Order.
Custom Order.
How to Order.
Payment Options.
Privacy Policy.
Made to Order Army Air Corps
Back <<.
Sku:   AB29ET

Model Name:   B-29 ENOLA GAY

Manufacturer:   BOEING

Price: Contact Us
History:
Enola Gay is a Boeing B-29 Superfortress bomber, named after Enola Gay Tibbets, mother of pilot Paul Tibbets. On 6 August 1945, during the final stages of World War II, it became the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb as a weapon of war. The bomb, code-named "Little Boy", was targeted at the city of Hiroshima, Japan, and caused extensive destruction.
The Enola Gay gained additional attention in 1995 when the cockpit and nose section of the aircraft was exhibited at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution in downtown Washington, D.C. The exhibit was changed due to a controversy over original historical script displayed with the aircraft. Since 2003 the entire restored B-29 has been on display at NASM's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

On 6 November 1945, Lewis flew the Enola Gay back to the United States, arriving at the 509th's new base at Roswell Army Air Field, New Mexico, on 8 November. On 29 April 1946, Enola Gay left Roswell as part of Operation Crossroads and flew to Kwajalein on 1 May. It was not chosen to make the test drop at Bikini Atoll and left Kwajalein on 1 July, the date of the test, and reached Fairfield-Suisun Army Air Field, California, the next day.

The decision was made to preserve the Enola Gay, and on 24 July 1946, the aircraft was flown to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, in preparation for storage. On 30 August 1946, the title to the aircraft was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution and was removed from the USAAF inventory. From 1946 to 1961, the Enola Gay was put into temporary storage at a number of locations:
·
1 September 1946: Davis-Monthan AFB.
·
3 July 1949: Orchard Place Air Field, Park Ridge, Illinois, flown there by Gen. Tibbets for acceptance by the Smithsonian.
·
12 January 1952: Pyote Air Force Base, Texas, moved after O'Hare International Airport's location was announced.
·
2 December 1953: Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland.
·
10 August 1960: disassembly at Andrews begun by personnel of the Smithsonian.
·
21 July 1961: components transported to Smithsonian storage facility at Suitland, Maryland.
Restoration of the bomber began on 5 December 1984, at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland-Silver Hill, Maryland.
The propellers that were used on the bombing mission were later shipped to Texas A&M University. One of these propellers was trimmed to 12½ ft for use in the university's Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The lightweight aluminum variable pitch propeller is powered by a 1,250 kVA electric motor providing a wind speed up to 200 mph.