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Model Name: USS MAKIN ISLAND (CVE-93)

Price: Contact Us
History:
USS Makin Island (CVE-93) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy. Named for the 1942 Makin raid,[1] she was laid down on 12 January 1944 by Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, Vancouver, Washington; launched 5 April 1944; sponsored by Mrs. B. B. Nichol; and commissioned at Astoria, Oregon, 9 May 1944, Commander W. B. Whaley in command.

Following a brief west coast shakedown cruise, on the eighth of June, Makin Island left for San Diego, California, stopping at Alameda, California, to load bombs and aviation gasoline. Makin Island departed San Diego on 19 June 1944, to ferry aircraft and men to Pearl Harbor, Majuro, and Kwajalein, returning to San Diego 24 July. The escort carrier then trained out of San Diego, preparing for combat until 16 October, when she sailed for Ulithi via Pearl Harbor and Eniwetok, arriving 5 November.

On 10 November, the ship got underway for Leyte, protecting convoys in transit to the invasion beachhead. Extensive air operations were conducted, but no enemy resistance was encountered. On 22 November, she sailed to Manus for the forthcoming invasion of Luzon.

Flying the pennant of Rear Admiral C. T. Durgin, Commander TG 77.4, Makin Island left Manus 27 December to rendezvous with the invasion force in Surigao Strait, Leyte. Sailing for Lingayen Gulf, 3 January 1945, the carrier was subjected to fierce, almost continuous enemy air attack during the passage to the assault beaches. Though sister carrier Ommaney Bay was sunk and a number of other ships damaged, Makin Island arrived unscathed 6 January. For the next 11 days, she remained off the beachhead flying air support for the amphibious operation, then sailed for Ulithi.
Admiral Durgin flew his flag in Makin Island once more, during the invasion of Iwo Jima, off which she arrived 16 February. Her planes made pre-invasion strikes and after the landings provided aerial fire support, essential to success in the hot action ashore, until 8 March. The carrier group again came under heavy Japanese kamikaze attacks, but Makin Island once more was not hit. After replenishing at Ulithi, she sailed for Okinawa, again as flagship.
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Escort Carriers